Religion, Philosophy, Ethics A-Level at The Swan

The study of RPE at The Swan prepares you for every possible pathway. This course is not simply academic; it deals with fundamental questions that affect our perception of reality and the way we live our lives.

RPE students will consider questions which have mystified the great thinkers throughout time such as: does God exist? How can we determine what is good and what is evil? Is there a connection between the mind, body and soul? And how does religion interact with a secular society?

You will be taught how to write rigorous and analytical essays drawing on a wide range of key philosophical ideas, ethical theories, and theological positions, developing your ability to reason, and deploy a range of material to demonstrate understanding and justifications with the support of a team of experienced RPE teachers.

6 in at least one of GCSE English Literature or Language

Desirable – a GCSE in one or more Humanities subject

 

OCR A-Level Religious Studies (H573)

Component 1: Philosophy of Religion (33% of A Level, 2h exam)

This unit covers:

Ancient philosophical influences

the nature of the soul, mind and body

Arguments about the existence or non-existence of God

The nature and impact of religious experience

The challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil

Ideas about the nature of God

Issues in religious language.

 

Component 2: Religion and Ethics (33% of A Level, 2h exam)

This unit covers:

Normative ethical theories

The application of ethical theory to two contemporary issues of importance

Ethical language and thought

Debates surrounding the significant idea of conscience

Sexual ethics and the influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs

 

Component 3: Developments in religious thought (33% 2h exam)

This unit covers:

Religious beliefs, values and teachings, their interconnections and how they vary historically and in the contemporary world

Sources of religious wisdom and authority

Practices which shape and express religious identity, and how these vary within a tradition

Significant social and historical developments in theology and religious thought

Key themes related to the relationship between religion and society.